The Value of Legal Translation Professionals

Words to Deeds Conference 2018

 

PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS

Many people are flying in from other countries, and therefore, as last year, we are offering optional pre-conference workshops, for registered conference attendees and venue hosts only. Each workshop will last around 1 hour, plus time for Q&A. The price, to cover speaker expenses, and excluding Eventbrite and credit card fees where applicable, will be £25 per workshop if booked singly, or £75 for the whole day of five workshops. To register, using the personal code you have received by email, click on the "Registration" page and enter your code.

 
 

MORNING

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For the two morning sessions we will be hosted at its state-of-the-art Holborn headquarters by leading law firm Irwin Mitchell. The firm has helped over one million clients in its 100-year history. Irwin Mitchell Group offers a wide range of services, and helps its clients both personally and with their business interests across its Private Wealth, Business and Personal Legal service divisions.

 
Chartered Linguist Christina Guy is a Dutch to English legal translator and interpreter based in The Hague, The Netherlands. As a native of the UK with long experience in providing language services in the legal, commercial and diplomatic sectors, she is a passionate advocate of efficient quality. Several years ago she established the translators’ forum Stridonium with the help of other committed language specialists. Her work is almost entirely for large international law firms, with a particular focus on corporate litigation, competition law and EU law.

Chartered Linguist Christina Guy is a Dutch to English legal translator and interpreter based in The Hague, The Netherlands. As a native of the UK with long experience in providing language services in the legal, commercial and diplomatic sectors, she is a passionate advocate of efficient quality.

Several years ago she established the translators’ forum Stridonium with the help of other committed language specialists. Her work is almost entirely for large international law firms, with a particular focus on corporate litigation, competition law and EU law.

Workshop 1: Collaborating with clients to get a better result

The landscape of legal translation is changing. Like many other sectors, including the law, translators face not only the inexorable march of machines, but also the interposition of platforms and intermediaries that are driving a shift from translation to tech services.

Most of us are likely to bristle at exhortations to adapt or perish – especially when we’re told precisely how we should go about it.

This workshop takes a step back from the merry-go-round and takes a look at things from a slightly different angle. We will consider the opportunities for translators and clients to redefine their roles in this changing environment.

The focus will be on moving from translation as a stand-alone process to collaboration between translator and author, integrating translation into the drafting process. This can create an additional layer of quality assurance for lawyers in any situation, ranging from high-speed drafting in international litigation to revising versions of texts for publication.  The aim is to explore features of CAT tools and other ideas that enable the individual professional translator to deliver added value to the client.

 
Robin Bonthrone has over 25 years’ experience as a German-to-English financial/legal translator specialising in financial accounting and reporting; audit, assurance and advisory; tax law, financial legislation; financial sector regulation and supervision; and corporate legal. Among other things, he coordinated the German version of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs) for several years and translates the German Accounting Standards for the Accounting Standards Committee of Germany. He is a very experienced financial translation trainer and is also currently co-chair of the FIT ISO Standards Committee.

Robin Bonthrone has over 25 years’ experience as a German-to-English financial/legal translator specialising in financial accounting and reporting; audit, assurance and advisory; tax law, financial legislation; financial sector regulation and supervision; and corporate legal.

Among other things, he coordinated the German version of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs) for several years and translates the German Accounting Standards for the Accounting Standards Committee of Germany. He is a very experienced financial translation trainer and is also currently co-chair of the FIT ISO Standards Committee.

Workshop 2: Where Financial Meets Legal: The new European Framework for Financial and Non-financial Reporting

Recent years have seen a steady expansion in the volume and variety of information that EU listed companies in particular are legally required to disclose. You’re probably familiar with the concept of ‘consolidated financial statements’. But what about ‘consolidated non-financial statements’? Or ‘consolidated corporate governance statements’, ‘consolidated non-financial reports’ and ‘country-by-country reporting’?

This pre-conference workshop starts with an overview of the current EU financial reporting framework, including the latest requirements under the Accounting Directive as well as the current International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs) ‘as adopted by the EU’ that apply to publicly traded companies.

This is followed by an introduction to the updated European legal framework for corporate non-financial reporting, including reporting obligations under the revised Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Directive and the Transparency Directive. These have added a whole new dimension to the statutory reporting regime for companies in the EU, and in particular for the listed companies that represent a huge market for financial and legal translations.

 

 

AFTERNOON

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In the afternoon we move to Canary Wharf where our workshops will be held in the iconic 'ticker-tape' building of Thomson Reuters. Our host, the Canadian multinational media and information firm, operates in more than 100 countries, and has more than 45,000 employees. Its legal publishing history in London stretches back to 1799, and today it offers an extensive suite of resources for all those working across legal and financial fields.

 
Gianluca Pontrandolfo currently teaches at the prestigious University of Trieste Department of Legal Sciences, Language, Interpreting and Translation Studies (formerly SSLMIT). He combines highly respected academic research with broad experience of practice. His practical experience includes the official translation of the Italian Code of Criminal Procedure, and a wide range of court and other legal documents, particularly from Spanish. His doctorate involved a groundbreaking comparison of Italian, Spanish and British English criminal judgments.

Gianluca Pontrandolfo currently teaches at the prestigious University of Trieste Department of Legal Sciences, Language, Interpreting and Translation Studies (formerly SSLMIT). He combines highly respected academic research with broad experience of practice.

His practical experience includes the official translation of the Italian Code of Criminal Procedure, and a wide range of court and other legal documents, particularly from Spanish.

His doctorate involved a groundbreaking comparison of Italian, Spanish and British English criminal judgments.

Workshop 3: Challenges of translating criminal judgments

Judgments are one of the most complex genres that legal translators can come across in their professional career. Perhaps the most important judicial decision, it usually contains a compendium of the whole case and often encompasses excerpts of other legal documents produced during the proceedings, which makes it a particularly challenging text from the translator's viewpoint.

The aim of this workshop is to guide attendees towards identifying the main constraints legal translators have to face while dealing with this judicial genre.

Strategies and techniques that can be adopted during the translation process will be analysed and discussed, keeping in mind common law vs. civil law differences applied to criminal procedure in the background.

Examples will be provided using English, Spanish and Italian, but the principles and methods demonstrated in the workshop are just as suitable for those working in other languages.

 
Kirsten Maslen is Head of Government & Academic at Thomson Reuters, Legal UK & Ireland. Previously, she was an Editor for Practical Law specialising in public procurement and public-private commercial projects, having worked in private practice and as an in-house lawyer in local government where she was responsible for large infrastructure, outsourcing and strategic partnering projects. Kirsten started her career as a teacher, translator and interpreter before qualifying in the law.

Kirsten Maslen is Head of Government & Academic at Thomson Reuters, Legal UK & Ireland. Previously, she was an Editor for Practical Law specialising in public procurement and public-private commercial projects, having worked in private practice and as an in-house lawyer in local government where she was responsible for large infrastructure, outsourcing and strategic partnering projects. Kirsten started her career as a teacher, translator and interpreter before qualifying in the law.

Jessica Brown, Customer Education Director, Thomson Reuters Legal, UK & Ireland, joined Thomson Reuters in 2001 after graduating Law School. She has worked in the Online Support team and as a Trainer. She has managed the Client Training Team for the last 12 years and works with organisations in every sector to implement and deliver innovative training for online services and software.

Jessica Brown, Customer Education Director, Thomson Reuters Legal, UK & Ireland, joined Thomson Reuters in 2001 after graduating Law School. She has worked in the Online Support team and as a Trainer. She has managed the Client Training Team for the last 12 years and works with organisations in every sector to implement and deliver innovative training for online services and software.

Workshop 4: Maximizing electronic legal resources

Our hosts for the afternoon, Thomson Reuters, will present their extensive suite of electronic legal resources, which includes pay-for and free access tools.

Overall, Practical Law is an online legal know-how service that provides rigorous peer-reviewed resources, such as practice notes, current awareness and standard documents. The resources are created and maintained by an extensive team of expert editors who have significant experience of working for the world’s leading law firms, companies and public sector organisations. Whether you need an accessible, authoritative overview of an area of law, or you simply want important updates on your existing specialism, Practical Law can help.

One particularly relevant example is the cross-border resource centre, which allows users to compare specific legal topics across different jurisdictions, selecting the countries in question.

Used in over 60 countries, Westlaw International is a global legal research library built on some of the world’s best legal, news and business information. With over 28,000 databases of case law, legislation, law reviews, treaties and directories drawn from Thomson Reuters businesses, including Sweet & Maxwell, Ellis Publications, Carswell and Westlaw, you can add local authority and insight to your international work. A comprehensive collection of available subscriptions means you’ll be able to efficiently search and retrieve results tailored to your specific needs. And what’s more, you’ll have the convenience of being able to access Westlaw International any time, anywhere, since all you need is internet access.

Regardless of size, from large global law firms to sole practitioners, legal resources from Thomson Reuters are aligned with people who all share common attributes – optimism, intelligence and a huge talent for their chosen field. People who have worked hard to get where they are today and who rightly demand the same standard of excellence from the technology they use.

 
Frédéric Houbert is a legal and financial translator with 20 years' experience. He has taught legal translation at postgraduate level and conducted seminars for professional bodies and academic institutions. He speaks regularly at translator events around the world, and has published numerous articles on legal translation and the language of the law, as well as being the author of three successful books on the subject (see right). His current clients include the International Criminal Court and INTERPOL.

Frédéric Houbert is a legal and financial translator with 20 years' experience. He has taught legal translation at postgraduate level and conducted seminars for professional bodies and academic institutions. He speaks regularly at translator events around the world, and has published numerous articles on legal translation and the language of the law, as well as being the author of three successful books on the subject (see right). His current clients include the International Criminal Court and INTERPOL.

A jurilinguist and certified legal translator for the past 30 years, Louis Beaudoin teaches legal translation and legal drafting and has given many presentations all over the world on Jurilinguistics, Legal Translation and Legal Drafting in French and English. He is the author of two reference works (see right). He worked for the United Nations as a reviser for the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda in Arusha, Tanzania.

A jurilinguist and certified legal translator for the past 30 years, Louis Beaudoin teaches legal translation and legal drafting and has given many presentations all over the world on Jurilinguistics, Legal Translation and Legal Drafting in French and English. He is the author of two reference works (see right). He worked for the United Nations as a reviser for the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda in Arusha, Tanzania.

Workshop 5: In Conversation - Louis Beaudoin & Frédéric Houbert on Dictionary-Making for Legal Translation, or in other words, how to do legal lexicography in ten easy lessons!

We round off the day with an ‘In Conversation’ session between two highly experienced legal translators, Louis Beaudoin and Frédéric Houbert, who are, at the same time, authors of dictionaries that are essential reading in the field. The discussion will take place in English.

Frédéric Houbert’s Practical Guide to Legal Translation, published by Maison du dictionnaire in 2005, was one of the first publications aimed a working translators to take a comprehensive approach to the subject extending far beyond ‘word for word’. He has since published a work on contract language, and most recently, in 2014, a dictionary of legal terminology.

Louis Beaudoin is the author of two reference works published by the leading Canadian publisher Editions Yvon Blais, Expressions juridiques en un clin d’œil / Legal expressions in a wink, a bilingual work examining collocations in legal discourse now in its 3rd edition, and Les mots du droit Legal Thesaurus, a legal lexicon also twice reprinted.

This last workshop of the day takes a deliberately relaxed conversational format, and will also encourage questions from participants.